Mom’s Who Loose Their Sh**!

Mom’s Who Loose Their Sh**!

Recently there has been a lot of talk on social media about mom’s who lose their sh**. They lose it at the end of their day when they’ve clocked in a 18-hour shift. They lose it after they’ve swept the kitchen floor twelve times that day and still manage to locate the rogue cheerio’s by stepping on them, grinding the crunchy mass into their newly laundered merino wool sock. They lose it after the 24th tuck in to include the 8th sip of water, the removal of the lodged booger, and the multiple security checks of the gloom under the bed. Or when their significant other comes home and asks what they’ve been doing all day as they step over the random discarded muddy socks on the floor instead of picking them up…

As patient as they try to be…   sometimes Mom’s do lose their sh**.

And you know what? It’s ok. We are all human. We all try our darndest, and we all at times, are going to get to the end of our ropes. We shouldn’t let it be a reflection of our mothering ability, but at times it might seem that way.

We try to be the best we can, and we love our families dearly. But sometimes, just sometimes, it gets to be so much that the stress and tension of so much riding on just us to please so many other humans…that we reach a certain point!

Hence, the losing of the sh**.

 

 

We still love you. We will still feed you, care for you, check under the beds, and yes, even remove the challenging doosie of a lodged booger. But sometimes we just need a moment.

So, when you see that mom at the grocery store with a couple of flailing little bodies horizontal on the floor and she is trying ever so gracefully to instruct her hooligans to get up and get moving with no reaction from them but to continue the belligerent display of spaziness, cut her some slack. Give her the ole’ head nod that you totally get it and you support her as a fellow community member from the mama’s who sometimes just lose their sh**.


Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween!!!

Another Halloween rolls around and we are all a year older and again get to enjoy the celebration of trick or treating and Halloween traditions as we gather with family and friends.

To some it can also be the celebration of the onset of Samhain. The celebration of the end of the harvest season. The end of summer.

To others it is honoring our departed loved ones and remembering them. Connecting with their spirit energy is an important part of Halloween to some.

It also can be a time of reflection as we go into a different distinctive season. A time to look at ourselves, our lives, and our surroundings and see if where we are heading is truly our destiny.

 

Is this feeling a way of communication used by those who have passed on and are attempting to connect with us in some fashion to help guide us with our decisions? Perhaps. Is it because the veil between the two worlds is at its thinnest and the chance of such a connection is at its peak? Maybe.

 

What do each of us do to possibly prepare for such an event that could bring us closer to spirits of those across the veil?

Whatever is needed for you to fill your own heart with comfort is wonderful and your own.

What do you do for the Halloween holiday?

Blessed be…

 

How Do I Raise Such A Spirited Child?

I was recently talking to my son and discussing what a spirited and, shall we say, “active” child he was when he was younger. He’s now well into his twenties and has been reflecting on life. He actually apologized for being such a handful for me. I assured him that was absolutely not necessary, and that I never viewed his spirited nature as a burden or complication while he was growing up.

I explained to him that my philosophy with child rearing and parenting in general is to always follow the child when you can. If a child seems more spirited or active, or quiet, or passive, I believe that following that individual child is what is important, and not trying to fit him or her into a specific mold that has been set out before us on how to raise our children. In addition, we do not “shame raise” our kids. We don’t tell them that they will disappoint us if they make a mistake or bring home a bad grade from school. To attempt to dent the psyche or the actual soul of a child in that manner is just cruel.

Unfortunately, I have seen parents that rear their children that way. Those children may grow up and appear to be functioning adults, but are they confident? Do they continually seek and need approval from others in their relationships? Are they actually happy with themselves, or do they continue to feel that they may just not be good enough?

I am in no way a perfect parent, but am proud that all my children are strong, ethical, and kind human beings. And yes, some were more spirited than others. Discovering what they need to actually channel that sprit is the adventure. Is it in creativity? It may be in dance, art, theater, or writing. Is the need to find the gateway for success in something like soccer, track, or computer design? They are all individuals and it is up to us, their parents, to unearth their talents or interests through support and following their lead. Not suppressing them with unnecessary shame or teaching them that holding grudges and negativity is healthy.

Sure, my children made mistakes and had consequences to unwise decisions that they may have made. Those consequences were swift, and may not have been fun, but were never in place to make them feel less of themselves. Quite the opposite. They learned cause and effect, right from wrong, and how to not repeat the mistake. They learned. They built from that foundation.

We are all doing the best we can with our children. They don’t come with an instruction booklet. Do we make mistakes with them? Sure. Do we attempt to learn from those mistakes for the future or even with the next kid? Hopefully. And hopefully we don’t totally mess them up along the way. But guiding those with that extra little twinkle in their eyes, aka high spirit, is a gift that can only make you stronger. Or totally deflate you some days. 😊

Are you the parent of a spirited child?